Warrant

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notmartha
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Warrant

Post by notmartha » Wed Apr 01, 2020 5:34 am

In response to a question at a briefing from the Rose Garden on 3-29-20, Trump said:
“Well, I’m prepared to do whatever is necessary to, number one, save lives, and number two, bring our economy back strong just like it was before. I think our economy has a chance to be just as good and even better than it was before.

And remember, a lot of the money that you read about, that’s all coming back. These are loans to great companies that got stopped from doing business. They’ll be back very soon. So much of the money that we’re talking about, that money is coming back, and we’ll take warrants — meaning, we’ll take pieces of the company for the taxpayers of our nation.

I expect that we’ll make a lot of money with that money. We’re going to make a lot of money, and that’s okay. I don’t even want to talk about making money, because what I want to talk about is two things: Number one is saving lives, and number two is bringing our economy back. Okay? But I think we’re going to do very well. That whole money, a lot of it is coming back.”
How does "we'll take warrants— meaning, we’ll take pieces of the company for the taxpayers of our nation" look? There is more in the actual bill that was passed HERE. Definitions of "warrant" follow, but I wonder how this will look on paper and in action? I'm hearing many people wanting to take the bait of "interest free loans" for their small businesses without realizing they may be giving "pieces of the company" to other "taxpayers".

Bouvier’s Law Dictionary, 1856
WARRANT, crim. law, Practice.

1. A writ issued by a justice of the peace or other authorized officer, directed to a constable or other proper person, requiring him to arrest a person therein named, charged with committing some offence, and to bring him before that or some other justice of the peace.
2. It should regularly be made under the hand and seal of the justice and dated. No warrant ought to be issued except upon the oath or affirmation of a witness charging the defendant with, the offence. 3 Binn. Rep. 88.
3. The reprehensible practice of issuing blank warrants which once prevailed in England, was never adopted here. 2 Russ. on Cr. 512; Ld. Raym. 546; 1 Salk. 175; 1 H. Bl. R. 13; Doct. Pl. 529; Wood's Inst. 84; Com. Dig. Forcible Entry, D 18, 19; Id. Imprisonment, H 6,; Id. Pleader, 3 K 26; Id. Pleader, 3 M 23. Vide Search warrant.
4. A bench warrant is a process granted by a court authorizing a proper officer to apprehend and bring before it some on charged with some contempt, crime or misdemeanor. See Bench warrant.
5. A search warrant is a process issued by a competent court or officer authorizing an officer therein named or described, to examine a house or other place for the purpose of finding goods which it is alleged have been stolen. See Search warrant.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 1st Edition, 1891
WARRANT, n.

1. A writ or precept from a competent authority in pursuance of law, directing the doing of an act, and addressed to an officer or person competent to do the act, and affording him protection from damage, if he does it. 71 N. Y. 376.

2. Particularly, a writ or precept issued by a magistrate, justice, or other competent authority, addressed to a sheriff, constable, or other officer, requiring him to arrest the body of a person therein named, and bring him before the magistrate or court, to answer, or to be examined, touching some offense which he is charged with having committed. See, also, BENCH—WARRANT; SEARCH-WARRANT.

3. A warrant is an order by which the drawer authorizes one person to pay a particular sum of money. 2 Kan. 130.

4. An authority issued to a collector of taxes, empowering him to collect the taxes extended on the assessment roll, and to make distress and sale of goods or land in default of payment.

5. An order issued by the proper authorities of a municipal corporation, authorizing the payee or holder to receive a certain sum out of the municipal treasury.

6. A land-warrant is a warrant issued at the local land-offices of the United States to purchasers of public lands, on the surrender of which, at the general land-office at Washington, they receive a conveyance from the general government.
The Century Dictionary, an Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language, 1895
warrant (wor'ant),

1. Protector; protection; defense; safeguard.

2. Security; guaranty; assurance; voucher; attestation; evidence; pledge; that which attests or proves.

3. Authority; authorization; sanction; justification.

4. An act, instrument, or obligation by which one person authorizes another to do something which he has not otherwise a right to do; an act or instrument investing one with a right or with authority, and thus securing him from blame, loss, or damage; hence, anything which authorizes or justifies an act ; a license.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 2nd Edition, 1910
WARRANT, n.

1. A writ or precept from a competent authority in pursuance of law, directing the doing of an act, and addressed to an officer or person competent to do the act, and affording him protection from damage, if he does it. People v. Wood, 71 N. Y. 376.

2. Particularly, a writ or precept issued by a magistrate, justice, or other competent authority, addressed to a sheriff, constable, or other officer, requiring him to arrest the body of a person therein named, and bring him before the magistrate or court, to answer, or to be examined, touching some offense which he is charged with having committed. See, also, Bench-Warrant; Search-Warrant.

3. A warrant is an order by which the drawer authorizes one person to pay a particular sum of money. Shawnee County v. Carter, 2 Kan. 130.

4. An authority issued to a collector of taxes, empowering him to collect the taxes extended on the assessment roll, and to make distress and sale of goods or land in default of payment.

5. An order issued by the proper authorities of a municipal corporation, authorizing the payee or holder to receive a certain sum out of the municipal treasury.
Ballentine’s Law Dictionary, James A. Ballentine, Third Edition, 1969
Warrant.

Noun:
A form of process, such as a warrant for the arrest of a Person. 42 Am J1st Proc § 2. An order authorizing a payment of money by another person to a third person. An order or draft on the treasury of a public body, payable on presentation when funds are available, or at a fixed date with interest, if authorized by statute. Marshall v State. 1 88 Fla 329. 102 So 650. A notice of a town meeting. 52 Am J1st Towns § 13. Justification or sanction for some act or course of conduct.

Verb:
To enter into an obligation of warranty; to become a warrantor. To give authorization or sanction for some act or course of conduct.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 4th Edition, 1968, 5th Edition, 1979
WARRANT, n.

1. A writ or precept from a competent authority in pursuance of law, directing the doing of an act, and addressed to an officer or person competent to do the act, and affording him protection from damage, if he does it. People v. Wood, 71 N.Y. 376.

2. Particularly, a writ or precept issued by a magistrate, justice, or other competent authority, addressed to a sheriff, constable, or other officer, requiring him to arrest the body of a person therein named, and bring him before the magistrate or court, to answer, or to be examined, touching some offense which he is charged with having committed. See People v. Baxter, City Ct., 32 N.Y.S.2d 325, 327. See, also, Bench-Warrant; Search-Warrant.

3. An order by which the drawer authorizes one person to pay a particular sum of money. Shawnee County v. Carter, 2 Kan. 130.

4. An authority issued to a collector of taxes, empowering him to collect the taxes extended on the assessment roll, and to make distress and sale of goods or land in default of payment.

5. A command of a council, board, or official whose duty it is to pass upon the validity and determine the amount of a claim against the municipality, to the treasurer to pay money out of
any funds in the municipal treasury, which are or may become available for the purpose specified, to a designated person whose claim therefore has been duly adjusted and allowed. Roe v. Roosevelt Water Conservation Dist., 41 Ariz. 197, 16 P.2d 967, 970; State v. State Board of Examiners, 74 Mont 1, 238 P. 316, 328.

A "warrant" differs from a "bond" in that a bond is a "negotiable instrument", whereas a warrant is nonnegotiable and is subject at all times to the defenses it would be were it in the hands of the original payee, which is not the case with a negotiable bond. Adams v. McGill, Tex.Clv.App., 146 S.W.2d 332, 334.

6. In England, a dividend warrant or coupon. See Coupons.

DOS/USAID, FAM, 1 FAM 621.5
warrant –

An official document issued by the Secretary of the Treasury that reflects an amount of money authorized and appropriated by public law to be withdrawn from the Department of Treasury.
Warranted amounts are established in Treasury Department accounts and subsequent fiscal activity reported by administering departments and agencies is reflected against those amounts for consolidated Federal accounting.
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