Pandemic / Epidemic / Endemic

Comprehending laws and contracts is impossible, unless we first learn the meaning of the words and phrases they contain.

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Pandemic / Epidemic / Endemic

Post by notmartha » Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:53 pm

BIBLE

The word “epidemic” is not found in the KJV, but is found in these translations:

God’s Word, God's Word to the Nations Bible Society, 1995
Deuteronomy 32:24 - They will be starved by famines and ravaged by pestilence and deadly epidemics. I will send vicious animals against them along with poisonous animals that crawl on the ground.
2 Chronicles 7:13 - I may shut the sky so that there is no rain, or command grasshoppers to devour the countryside, or send an epidemic among my people.
Psalm 91:6 - plagues that roam the dark, epidemics that strike at noon.
New Living Translation, Tyndale Charitable Trust, 2004
Ezekiel 14:19 - Or suppose I were to pour out my fury by sending an epidemic into the land, and the disease killed people and animals alike.
DEFINITIONS

Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language, 1828
EPIDEM'IC
EPIDEM'ICAL, adjective [Gr. people.] Common to many people. An epidemic disease is one which seizes a great number of people, at the same time, or in the same season. Thus we speak of epidemic measles; epidemic fever; epidemic catarrh. It is used in distinction from endemic or local. Intemperate persons have every thing to fear from an epidemic influenza.
1. Generally prevailing; affecting great numbers; as epidemic rage; an epidemic evil.

EPIDEM'IC, noun A popular disease; a disease generally prevailing. The influenza of October and November 1789, that of March and April 1790, that of the winter 1824-25, and of 1825-26, were very severe epidemics.
PANDEM'IC, adjective [Gr. all, and people.] Incident to a whole people; epidemic; as a pandemic disease.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 1st Edition, 1891
EPIDEMIC.

This term, in its ordinary and popular meaning, applies to any disease which is widely spread or generally prevailing at a given place and time.
The Century Dictionary, an Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language, 1895
epidemic (ep-i-dem'ik), a. and n.

I, a. Common to or affecting a whole people or a great number in a community; generally diffused and prevalent. A disease is said to be epidemic in a community when it appears in a great number of cases at the same time in that locality, but is not permanently prevalent there. In the latter case it is said to be endemic.

II. n. 1. A temporary prevalence of a disease throughout a community: as, an epidemic of smallpox.
2. The disease thus prevalent.
pandemic (iian-dem'ik), a. and n.

I. ii. Incident to a whole people; epidemic: as, a pandemic disease.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 2nd Edition, 1910
EPIDEMIC.

This term, in its ordinary and popular meaning, applies to any disease which is widely spread or generally prevailing at a given place and time. Pohalski v. Mutual L. Ins. Co., 36 N. Y. Super. Ct 234.
Ballentine’s Law Dictionary, James A. Ballentine, Third Edition, 1969
Epidemic disease.
A disease prevalent and spreading in the community.


Black’s Law Dictionary, 4th Edition, 1968
EPIDEMIC.

This term, in its ordinary and popular meaning, applies to any disease which is widely spread or generally prevailing at a given place and time. Bethlehem Steel Co. v. Industrial Accident Commission, 21 Ca1.2d 742, 135 P.2d 153, 157; Martin v. Springfield City Water Co., Mo.App., 128 S.W.2d 674, 679.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 5th Edition, 1979
Epidemic.

This term, in its ordinary and popular meaning, applies to any disease which is widely spread or
generally prevailing at a given place and time. Bethlehem Steel Co. v. Industrial Accident Commission, 21 Ca1.2d 742, 135 P.2d 153, 157; Martin v. Springfield City Water Co., Mo.App., 128 S.W.2d 674, 679.
United States Government Compendium of Interagency and Associated Terms, 2017
epidemic –
The increase of cases of a disease, often occurring suddenly, than what would be expected for that population in that area or at that time. Even one or two cases of certain diseases (such as cholera) can be considered an epidemic in other circumstances, an epidemic is defined by where the cases occur (e.g., West Nile virus in the United States) or when the cases occur (e.g., influenza in the summer). (SOURCE ‐ USAID, FOG, CHIII)
outbreak –
same definition as epidemic but is often used for a more limited geographic area.
endemic –
The constant presence and/ or usual presence of a disease or condition found in a population within a geographic area. This may also be thought of as the baseline.
pandemic and all-hazards preparedness reauthorization act –
Law signed in March 2013 to reauthorize certain programs under the Public Health Service Act and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act with respect to public health security and all-hazards and to amend those acts. Authorizes funding for certain public health and medical preparedness programs; amends the Public Health Service Act to enable the Secretary to authorize state health departments and tribes to temporarily reassign personnel funded under Public Health Service Act programs to respond to a federally declared public health emergency in their jurisdiction; authorizes funding for buying medical countermeasures under Project BioShield; increases the flexibility to support advanced research and development of medical countermeasures; increases flexibility to authorize emergency use of unapproved products and unapproved uses of approved products. (SOURCE ‐ DHHS, DHHS Quadrennial National Health Security Strategy Implementation Plan, 2015‐2018, Terms)

Excerted from The great pandemic hoax

https://blog.benwilliamslibrary.com/?p=7391

Stephen Lendman – 2, 4, 2020
On January 30, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the “coronavirus outbreak (to be) a public health emergency of international concern.”

On Sunday, US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases director Anthony Fauci said the coronavirus “almost certainly is going to be a pandemic.”

The WHO defines a “pandemic” as a “worldwide spread of a new disease.”

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) calls it “a disease that spreads across several countries or continents, usually affecting a large number of people.”

Britain’s Health and Safety Executive says a viral outbreak can be characterized as a pandemic if it’s “markedly different from recently circulating strains,” notably if “humans have little or no immunity” to it.

The NYT quoted former CDC director Thomas Frieden, saying it’s “increasingly unlikely (that the coronavirus) can be contained,” adding:

“It is therefore likely that it will spread, as flu and other organisms do, but we still don’t know how far, wide, or deadly it will be.”

The Terms

The term pandemic applies to a disease that affects large numbers of people worldwide – clearly not applicable to the coronavirus outbreak based on evidence so far. See below.

According to Mayo Clinic’s Dr. Pritish Tosh:

“In epidemiologic terms, an outbreak refers to a number of cases that exceeds what would be expected.”
“A pandemic is when there is an outbreak that affects most of the world.”
“We use the term endemic when there is an infection within a geographic location that lasts perpetually.”
An epidemic refers to an infectious disease outbreak in a particular country or community.
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