Allegiance

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Allegiance

Post by notmartha » Wed Nov 13, 2019 11:42 am

BIBLE

The word “allegiance” is not found in the KJV. It is, however, found in the following translations:

Holman Christian Standard Bible, 2008
1 Chronicles 12:29 - From the Benjaminites, the relatives of Saul: 3,000 (up to that time the majority of the Benjaminites maintained their allegiance to the house of Saul).
1 Chronicles 29:24 - All the leaders and the mighty men, and all of King David’s sons as well, pledged their allegiance to King Solomon.
2 Chronicles 30:8 - Don’t become obstinate now like your fathers did. Give your allegiance to Yahweh, and come to His sanctuary that He has consecrated forever. Serve the LORD your God so that He may turn His burning anger away from you,
2 Chronicles 36:13 - He also rebelled against King Nebuchadnezzar who had made him swear allegiance by God. He became obstinate and hardened his heart against returning to Yahweh, the God of Israel.
Isaiah 45:23 - By Myself I have sworn; Truth has gone from My mouth, a word that will not be revoked: Every knee will bow to Me, every tongue will swear allegiance.
Romans 6:20 - For when you were slaves of sin, you were free from allegiance to righteousness.
The Holy Bible, English Standard Version, Crossway Bibles, 2001
1 Chronicles 12:29 - Of the Benjaminites, the kinsmen of Saul, 3,000, of whom the majority had to that point kept their allegiance to the house of Saul.
1 Chronicles 29:24 - All the leaders and the mighty men, and also all the sons of King David, pledged their allegiance to King Solomon.
Isaiah 19:18 - In that day there will be five cities in the land of Egypt that speak the language of Canaan and swear allegiance to the LORD of hosts. One of these will be called the City of Destruction.
Isaiah 45:23 - By myself I have sworn; from my mouth has gone out in righteousness a word that shall not return: ‘To me every knee shall bow, every tongue shall swear allegiance.’
New Living Translation, 2004
1 Kings 12:27 - When these people go to Jerusalem to offer sacrifices at the Temple of the LORD, they will again give their allegiance to King Rehoboam of Judah. They will kill me and make him their king instead.”
2 Kings 25:11 - Nebuzaradan, the captain of the guard, then took as exiles the rest of the people who remained in the city, the defectors who had declared their allegiance to the king of Babylon, and the rest of the population.

Nehemiah 6:18 - For many in Judah had sworn allegiance to him because his father-in-law was Shecaniah son of Arah, and his son Jehohanan was married to the daughter of Meshullam son of Berekiah.
Isaiah 45:23 - I have sworn by my own name; I have spoken the truth, and I will never go back on my word: Every knee will bend to me, and every tongue will confess allegiance to me.”
Jeremiah 52:15 - Nebuzaradan, the captain of the guard, then took as exiles some of the poorest of the people, the rest of the people who remained in the city, the defectors who had declared their allegiance to the king of Babylon, and the rest of the craftsmen.
Acts 17:7 - And Jason has welcomed them into his home. They are all guilty of treason against Caesar, for they profess allegiance to another king, named Jesus.”
Hebrews 13:15 - Therefore, let us offer through Jesus a continual sacrifice of praise to God, proclaiming our allegiance to his name.
Revelation 13:3 - I saw that one of the heads of the beast seemed wounded beyond recovery—but the fatal wound was healed! The whole world marveled at this miracle and gave allegiance to the beast.
DEFINITIONS

Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language, 1828
ALLE'GIANCE, noun [Latin alligo, of ad and ligo, to bind. See Liege and League.]

The tie or obligation of a subject to his Prince or government; the duty of fidelity to a king, government or state. Every native or citizen owes allegiance to the government under which he is born. This is called natural or implied allegiance which arises from the connection of a person with the society in which he is born, and his duty to be a faithful subject, independent of any express promise. Express allegiance is that obligation which proceeds from an express promise, or oath of fidelity.

Local or temporary allegiance is due from an alien to the government or state in which he resides.
Bouvier’s Law Dictionary, 1856
ALLEGIANCE.

1. The tie which binds the citizen to the government, in return for the protection which the government affords him.

2. It is natural, acquired, or local. Natural allegiance is such as is due from all men born within the United States; acquired allegiance is that which is due by a naturalized citizen. It has never been decided whether a citizen can, by expatriation, divest himself absolutely of that character. 2 Cranch, 64; 1 Peters' C. C. Rep. 159; 7 Wheat. R. 283; 9 Mass. R. 461. Infants cannot assume allegiance, (4 Bin. 49) although they enlist in the army of the United States. 5 Bin. 429.

3. It seems, however, that he cannot renounce his allegiance to the United States without the permission of the government, to be declared by law. But for commercial purposes he may acquire the rights of a citizen of another country, and the place of his domicil determines the character of a party as to trade. 1 Kent, Com. 71; Com. Rep. 677; 2 Kent, Com. 42.

4. Local allegiance is that which is due from an alien, while resident in the United States, for the protection which the government affords him. 1 Bl. Com. 366, 372; Com. Dig. h.t; Dane's Ab. Index, h. t.; 1 East, P.C. 49 to 57.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 1st Edition, 1891
ALLEGIANCE.

By allegiance is meant the obligation of fidelity and obedience which the individual owes to the government under which he lives, or to his sovereign in return for the protection he receives. It may be an absolute and permanent obligation, or it may be a qualified and temporary one. The citizen or subject owes an absolute and permanent allegiance to his government or sovereign, or at least until, by some open and distinct act, he renounces it and becomes a citizen or subject of another government or another sovereign. The alien, while domiciled in the country, owes a local and temporary allegiance, which continues during the period of his residence. 16 Wall. 154.

“The tie or Iigamen which binds the subject [or citizen] to the king [or government] in return for that protection which the king [or government] affords the subject, [or citizen. "] 1 Bl. Comm. 366. It consists in “a true and faithful obedience of the subject due to his sovereign." 7 Coke, 4b.

Allegiance is the obligation of fidelity and obedience which every citizen owes to the state. Pol. Code Cal. § 55.
The Century Dictionary, an Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language, 1895
ALLEGIANCE.

1. The tie or obligation of a subject or citizen to his sovereign or government: the duty of fidelity to a king, government, or state.
Hence—2. Observance of obligation in general; fidelity to any person or thing ; devotion.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 2nd Edition, 1910
ALLEGIANCE.

By allegiance is meant the obligation of fidelity and obedience which the individual owes to the government under which he lives, or to his sovereign in return for the protection he receives. It may be an absolute and permanent obligation, or it may be a qualified and temporary one. The citizen or subject owes an absolute and' permanent allegiance to his government or sovereign, or at least until, by some open and distinct act, he renounces it and becomes a citizen or subject of another government or another sovereign. The alien, while domiciled in the country, owes a local and temporary allegiance, which continues during the period of his residence. Carlisle v. U. S., 16 Wall. 154. 21 L. Ed. 426; Jackson v. Goodell, 20 Johns. (N. Y.) 191 ; U. S. v. Wong Kim Ark, 169 U. S. 649, 18 Sup. Ct. 456, 42 L. Ed. 890; Wallace v. Harmstad. 44 Fa. 501.

"The tie or ligamen which binds the subject [or citizen] to the king [or government] in return for that protection which the king [or government] affords the subject, [or citizen."] 1 Bl. Comm. 366. It consists in "a true and faithful obedience of the subject due to his sovereign." 7 Coke, 46.

Allegiance Is the obligation of fidelity and obedience which every citizen owes to the state. Pol. Code Cal. $ 55.

—Local allegiance. That measure of obedience which is due from a subject of one government to another government, within whose territory he is temporarily resident.

—Natural allegiance. In English law. That kind of allegiance which is due from all men born within the king's dominions, immediately upon their birth, which is intrinsic and perpetual, and can not be divested by any act of their own. 1 Bl. Comm. 3(59; 2 Kent, Comm. 42.

- In American law. The allegiance due from citizens of the United States to their native country, and also from naturalized citizens, and which cannot be renounced without the permission of government, to be declared by law. 2 Kent, Comm.

It differs from local allegiance, which is temporary only, being due from an alien or stranger born for so long a time as he continues within the sovereign's dominions and protection. Fost. Cr. Law, 184.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 4th Edition, 1968
ALLEGIANCE.

Obligation of fidelity and obedience to government in consideration for protection that government gives. U. S. v. Kuhn, D.C.N.Y., 49 F.Supp. 407, 414.

The citizen or subject owes an absolute and permanent allegiance to his government or sovereign until he becomes a citizen or subject of another government or another sovereign. The alien owes a local and temporary allegiance during period of his residence. U. S. v. Wong Kim, Ark., 169 U.S. 649, 18 Sup.Ct. 456, 42 L.Ed. 890.

"The tie or ligamen which binds the subject [or citizen] to the king [or government] in return for that protection which the king [or government] affords the subject, [or citizen."] 1 Bl.Comm. 366. It consists in "a true and faithful obedience of the subject due to his sovereign," 7 Coke, 4b, and is a comparatively modern corruption of ligeance (ligeantia), which is derived from liege (ligius), meaning absolute or unqualified. It signified originally liege fealty, 1. e. absolute and unqualified fealty. 18 L. Q. Rev. 47.

Acquired allegiance, is that binding a naturalized citizen.

Local or actual allegiance, is that measure of obedience due from a subject of one government to another government, within whose territory he is temporarily resident. From this are excepted foreign sovereigns and their representatives, naval and armed forces when permitted to remain in or pass through the country or its waters.

Natural allegiance. In English law, that kind of allegiance which is due from all men born within the king's dominions, immediately upon their birth, which is intrinsic and perpetual, and- cannot be divested by any act of their own. 1 Bl.Comm. 369; 2 Kent, Comm. 42. In American law, the allegiance due from citizens of the United States to their native country, and also from naturalized citizens, and which cannot be renounced without the permission of government, to be declared by law. 2 Kent, Comm. 43-49.

It is said to be due to the king in his political, not his personal, capacity; L. R. 17 Q. B. D. 54, quoted in U. S. v. Wong Kim, Ark., 169 U.S. 663, 18 Sup.Ct. 456, 42 L.Ed. 890; and so in the United States "it is a political obligation" depending not on ownership of land, but on the enjoyment of the protection of government; Wallace v. Harmstad, 44 Pa. 492; and it "binds the citizen to the observance of all laws" of his own sovereign; Adams v. People, 1 N.Y. 173.
Ballentine’s Law Dictionary, James A. Ballentine, Third Edition, 1969
allegiance.

The obligation of fidelity and obedience which the individual owes to the government under which lie lives, or to his sovereign in return for the protection he receives. See oath of allegiance.

oath of allegiance.

An oath, required to be taken in open court by a person seeking naturalization, that he will support the Constitution of the United States: that he entirely and absolutely renounces and abjures all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, Potentate, State, or sovereignty of which he was before a citizen or subject: that he will support and defend the Constitution and the laws of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, and will bear true faith and allegiance to them: and that he will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by law, or perform noncombatant services in the Armed Forces of the United States when required, or will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required, depending upon his religious training and belief 8 USC § 1448(a).
Black’s Law Dictionary, 5th Edition, 1979
Allegiance

Obligation of fidelity and obedience to government in consideration for protection that government gives. U. S. v. Kuhn, D.C.N.Y., 49 F.Supp. 407, 414. See also Oath of allegiance.

Acquired allegiance, is that binding a naturalized citizen.

Local or actual allegiance, is that measure of obedience due from a subject of one government to another government, within whose territory he is temporarily resident. From this are excepted foreign sovereigns and their representatives, naval and armed forces when permitted to remain in or pass through the country or its waters.

Natural allegiance. In English law, that kind of allegiance which is due from all men born within the king's dominions, immediately upon their birth, which is intrinsic and perpetual, and cannot be divested by any act of their own. In American law, the allegiance due from citizens of the United States to their native country, and also from naturalized citizens, and which cannot be renounced without the permission of government, to be declared by law.
QUOTES

Rev. Francis Bellamy, in the September 8th, 1892, issue of The Youth's Companion –
I pledge allegiance to my Flag and to the Republic for which it stands;
one Nation, indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.
Theodore Roosevelt:
Behind the ostensible government sits enthroned an invisible government owing no allegiance and acknowledging no responsibility to the people. To destroy this invisible government, to befoul the unholy alliance between corrupt business and corrupt politics is the first task of the statesmanship of the day.
Lawrence Hunter:
Gun control is part and parcel of the ongoing collectivist effort to eviscerate individual sovereignty and replace it with dependence upon and allegiance to the state.
James C. Cacheris:
The statute mandating recitation of the pledge [of allegiance] is secular because it aims to foster democracy, which is both necessary to the survival of the concept and entirely independent of religion. [...] It is clear in the 2001 [Virginia] state law that no student is forced to accept the beliefs the pledge espouses.
Dr. Chester Pierce:
Every child in America who enters school at the age of five is mentally ill, because he comes to school with an allegiance toward our elected officials, toward our founding fathers, toward our institutions, toward the preservation of this form of government that we have. Patriotism, nationalism, and sovereignty, all that proves that children are sick because a truly well individual is one who has rejected all of those things, and is truly the international child of the future.
Albert Jay Nock:
It is interesting to observe that in the year 1935 the average individual's incurious attitude towards the phenomenon of the State is precisely what his attitude was toward the phenomenon of the Church in the year, say, 1500. ... it does not appear to have occurred to the Church-citizen of that day, any more than it occurs to the State-citizen of the present, to ask what sort of institution it was that claimed his allegiance.
Ronald Reagan:
Our coins bear the words 'In God We Trust'. We take the oath of office asking His help in keeping that oath. And we proclaim that we are a nation under God when we pledge allegiance to the flag. But we can't mention His name in a public school or even sing religious hymns that are nondenominational. Christmas can be celebrated in the school room with pine trees, tinsel and reindeers, but there must be no mention of the man whose birthday is being celebrated. One wonders how a teacher would answer if a student asked why it was called Christmas.
Lysander Spooner:
A government that can at pleasure accuse, shoot, and hang men, as traitors, for the one general offence of refusing to surrender themselves and their property unreservedly to its arbitrary will, can practice any and all special and particular oppressions it pleases. The result -- and a natural one -- has been that we have had governments, State and national, devoted to nearly every grade and species of crime that governments have ever practised upon their victims; and these crimes have culminated in a war that has cost a million of lives; a war carried on, upon one side, for chattel slavery, and on the other for political slavery; upon neither for liberty, justice, or truth. And these crimes have been committed, and this war waged, by men, and the descendants of men, who, less than a hundred years ago, said that all men were equal, and could owe neither service to individuals, nor allegiance to governments, except with their own consent.
Paul Harvey:
One would think by listening to all the propaganda about the United Nations that they are some sort of benevolent, peaceful organization. Never in the history of the United Nations has it stood for anything but killing and violence. They have never kept peace anywhere on this globe. Their sole function is to replace the U.S. military - dissolve all four branches of our armed forces. Their allegiance is only to the United Nations Charter which does not recognize the U.S. Constitution. This body is made up almost exclusively of communists and leaders of the bloodiest regimes on this globe. Their history and operating agenda is apparent to anyone who takes the time to sincerely and with an open mind, research the facts of this organization, separating truth from myth. Bilderberger participants ( another group committed to one-world domination) in 1992 called for 'conditioning the public to accept the idea of a U.N. army that could, by force, impose its will on the internal affairs of any nation.'
MISCELLANEOUS CITATIONS

4 U.S. Code § 4 - Pledge of allegiance to the flag; manner of delivery
The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag: “I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”, should be rendered by standing at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart. When not in uniform men should remove any non-religious headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart. Persons in uniform should remain silent, face the flag, and render the military salute. Members of the Armed Forces not in uniform and veterans may render the military salute in the manner provided for persons in uniform.
8 CFR 1337.1 - Oath of allegiance.
(a)Form of oath. Except as otherwise provided in the Act and after receiving notice from the district director that such applicant is eligible for naturalization pursuant to § 335.3 of 8 CFR chapter I, an applicant for naturalization shall, before being admitted to citizenship, take in a public ceremony held within the United States the following oath of allegiance, to a copy of which the applicant shall affix his or her signature:
I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God.

(b)Alteration of form of oath; affirmation in lieu of oath. In those cases in which a petitioner or applicant for naturalization is exempt from taking the oath prescribed in paragraph (a) of this section in its entirety, the inapplicable clauses shall be deleted and the oath shall be taken in such altered form. When a petitioner or applicant for naturalization, by reason of religious training and belief (or individual interpretation thereof), or for other reasons of good conscience, cannot take the oath prescribed in paragraph (a) of this section with the words “on oath” and “so help me God” included, the words “and solemnly affirm” shall be substituted for the words “on oath,” the words “so help me God” shall be deleted, and the oath shall be taken in such modified form. Any reference to ‘oath of allegiance’ in 8 CFR chapter I is understood to mean equally ‘affirmation of allegiance’ as described in this paragraph.

(c)Obligations of oath. A petitioner or applicant for naturalization shall, before being naturalized, establish that it is his or her intention, in good faith, to assume and discharge the obligations of the oath of allegiance, and that his or her attitude toward the Constitution and laws of the United States renders him or her capable of fulfilling the obligations of such oath.

(d)Renunciation of title or order of nobility. A petitioner or applicant for naturalization who has borne any hereditary title or has been of any of the orders of nobility in any foreign state shall, in addition to taking the oath of allegiance prescribed in paragraph (a) of this section, make under oath or affirmation in public an express renunciation of such title or order of nobility, in the following form:

(1) I further renounce the title of (give title or titles) which I have heretofore held; or

(2) I further renounce the order of nobility (give the order of nobility) to which I have heretofore belonged.
[ 22 FR 9824, Dec. 6, 1957, as amended at 24 FR 2584, Apr. 3, 1959; 32 FR 13756, Oct. 3, 1967; 56 FR 50499, Oct. 7, 1991]
Cyclopaedia of Political Science, Political Economy, and of the Political History of the United States, vol. 1 Abdication-Duty, John Joseph Lalor, [1881]
ALLEGIANCE (IN U.S. HISTORY).

I 1774-89. Until the opening of the American revolution, native or naturalized British subjects owed allegiance to the British crown, and, for more than a year after the armed forces of the king and his American dominions had met in battle, this obligation of allegiance was still acknowledged. The royal proclamation of Aug. 23, 1775, declaring the American colonists rebels, the act of parliament in December, 1775, authorizing the capture of American vessels, wherever found, the pamphlet of Payne, Common Sense, and, still more, the bombardments of Falmouth, (now Portland, Maine), Oct. 18, 1775, and of Norfolk, in Virginia, Jan. 1, 1776, were all arguments which convinced the colonists that allegiance, being dependent on protection, was no longer due to the king. The continental congress, however, which had already, in great measure, come under the control of the state legislatures, did not claim the allegiance of the American people, but resolved June 24, 1776: "That all persons abiding within any of the united colonies, and deriving protection from the laws of the same, owed allegiance to the said laws, and were members of the same; ***** and that all persons members of, or owing allegiance to, any of the united colonies, who should levy war against any of the said colonies within the same, or be adherent to the king of Great Britain, or other enemies of the said colonies, or any of them, within the same, giving to him or them aid or comfort, were guilty of treason against such colony." Jan. 25, 1777, Sir William Howe by proclamation offered protection to such citizens of New Jersey as should take the oath of allegiance to the king. Washington at once replied by a counter-proclamation, ordering all persons, who had thus received protection, to surrender their protections and take the oath of allegiance to the United States, or retire within the British lines. The novel idea of allegiance to the United States was the subject of very general and adverse criticism until Washington explained that he had prescribed no form of oath, and had only instructed his subordinates to insist upon an obligation "in no manner to injure the states." In February, 1778, congress prescribed the form of an oath, to be taken by officers of the army, and all others serving under congress, which was simply a renunciation of allegiance to the king of Great Britain, an acknowledgment of the independence of the United States, and an obligation to defend and serve them. This non-committal obligation remained the rule throughout the confederation. The state constitutions, adopted during the revolution and confederation, all provided for an oath of allegiance to the state alone, of which the following may serve as an example: "I, A.B., do truly and sincerely acknowledge, profess, testify and declare that the commonwealth of Massachusetts is, and of right ought to be, a free, sovereign and independent state, and I do swear that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the said
commonwealth ****."

—II. UNDER THE CONSTITUTION. The constitution (articles III. VI.) introduced two new features into the national government: not only United States senators and representatives, but all members of state legislatures, and all executive and judicial officers of the United States and of the several states, were to be sworn to support the constitution; and the crime of "treason against the United States," which had no existence under the confederation, was stated and defined. The 1st congress at once enforced both these provisions. The act of June 1, 1789, provided for the new oath of allegiance; and the act of April 30, 1790, declared the punishment of treason against the United States (see also ALIEN AND SEDITION LAWS). The state constitutions, thereafter adopted, contain the oath of allegiance to the state, but bound up in it is the oath of allegiance to the United States.

—The wave of reaction against the establishment of the national will as the basis of national government, (see UNITED STATES), which began to be apparent in the south about 1830, and which culminated in the rebellion, was marked by the introduction of a new and subtle doctrine as to allegiance. It defined allegiance as the paramount submission due by the citizen to the constitution and government of the state to which he belongs; and held that the citizen of a state owed to the government of the United States not allegiance, but obedience, because his own state, as a party to the confederation, enjoined it. It would follow from this that the citizen was bound as well to refuse obedience to the United States, and to array himself in arms against the national government, whenever ordered to do so by his state. A clear conception of this doctrine, and of its general acceptance by educated men in the south, will show the reason of the astonishingly sudden disappearance of the union party in the south in 1861; and will explain the course of A. H. Stephens, for example, who repeatedly and sincerely urged the maintenance of the union in December, 1860, and ninety days afterward, his state having seceded in the interim, was vice president of the confederate states, with his own full concurrence.

—The result of the rebellion settled the question of the citizen's obligation to "follow his state" against every other possibleauthority. The state constitutions formed in 1867-8 (see SECESSION, RECONSTRUCTION) contain provisions of which the following extract from that of Alabama is an example: "That this state has no right to sever its relations to the federal union, or to pass any law in derogation of the paramount allegiance of the citizens of this state to the government of the United States."

—After the states had been re-admitted to the union under these constitutions, some of them, as Texas and Arkansas, framed new constitutions in which the above provision was omitted. But as the supreme court has decided that the conditions, of which the above was a principal one, under which the state was admitted are binding upon the state, and that the state is estopped to deny their validity, it would seem that this provision, though omitted, is still binding in law. As matter of fact and politics it has been still more emphatically settled by war.

—The doctrine of the federal courts has always been that allegiance may be dissolved by the mutual consent of the government and its subjects or citizens, though the few decisions on this point touch only the deposition of allegiance by aliens, and the southern doctrine as to domestic allegiance has never been formally before the federal courts. A single case (cited in 3 Dall., below) lays down the principle that renunciation of allegiance to a state government does not imply or draw after it renunciation of allegiance to the United States. The British government, on the other hand, until the passage of its liberal naturalization act in 1844, refused to recognize the American doctrine (see EMBARGO, II.).

—See (I) 2 Public Journals of Congress, 216; 4 Washington's Writings, 298-319; 4 Public Journals of Congress, 49; 1 Poore's Federal and State Constitutions; 4 Cranch, 209; (II) 1 Stat. at Large, 23, 112; The Book of Allegiance, (arguments in South Carolina court of appeals, 1834); Thomas Cooper's Consolidation; 1 Tucker's Blackstone App., 170-187, and authorities cited under STATE SOVEREIGNTY and SECESSION; 2 Stephens' War Between the States, 297; 2 Appleton's Annual Cyclopædia, 270 (Debates in Confederate Congress, 1862); 13Wall., 646; S.C. 39 Geo., 306; W.B. Lawrence's Visitation and Search, 13; 3 Pet., 125; 3 Dall., 133.

ALEXANDER JOHNSTON.
ALLEGIANCE, Oath of.

The long civil wars which desolated England had, among other results, that of creating a host of pretenders to the crown, which passed from hand to hand during the War of the Roses. Thus, after the death of queen Mary, there were no less than fifteen competitors for the inheritance of the daughter of Henry VIII. Elisabeth, having had trouble enough in securing her rights, sought for means to strengthen her authority. The first parliament which she convoked therefore proposed to satisfy the wishes of the queen, and, for the first time, prescribed the oath of allegiance. By this oath, which might be exacted from
every person twelve years of age and upward, the queen was recognized as the only and legitimate sovereign; fidelity and obedience were promised her; and she was declared head and supreme defender of the church of England. King James I. had the form of the oath of allegiance modified by parliament in a more monarchical sense than was allowed by the terms employed in the reign of Elisabeth. After the revolution of 1688, the famous convention which formed itself into parliament, voted to retain the oath, but took good care to expunge everything in it which had the odor of passive obedience. The learned English author, Paley, who has commented at length on the terms and motives of the oath in its new form, proved that it justified even armed resistance in case the prince, by infirmity of mind or culpable action, should attack the liberties of the country. No doubt this interpretation, so conformable to the tone of the English mind, is of authority to day in the constitutional interpretation of the oath of allegiance.

—In France, under Napoleon III., the first opposition deputies elected after 1852, having refused the political oath, the senatusconsultum, of Feb. 17, 1858, prescribed that every candidate for deputy should first put on file the oath of fidelity to the emperor. More than one who had at first refused afterward decided to take the oath. (See OATH.)

MAURICE BLOCK.
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notmartha
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Re: Allegiance

Post by notmartha » Wed Nov 13, 2019 12:02 pm

Would the Founding Fathers say the Pledge of Allegiance? By FireBreathingChristian, September 25, 2017
http://www.firebreathingchristian.com/archives/15661
Here’s a question that modern day America worshippers don’t want you to ask: Would the Founding Fathers pledge their undying personal loyalty to the indivisible power of the State above them?

Would they consider such a thing?

Would they make the time to take such a pledge?

You know, when they’re not doing other stuff, like writing the Declaration of Independence or fighting a war for independence from…who was that again?

Oh yeah!

The State above them!

So whaddaya think?

Would the Founding Fathers say the modern American Pledge of Allegiance? (A pledge written by a Socialist in the late 1800s for the purpose of promoting the use of American flags in State-run public schools and helping to prevent any future Founding Father-like pursuits of independence from centralized power in Washington DC.)

This seems like a good question to be asking with all the flag and “respect for America” obsession flying around here lately in the “land of the free” and the home of the NSA.

If the Founding Fathers became the Founding Fathers by [*ahem*] emphatically and dramatically rejecting the notion of indivisible power in the State above them, then why are so many self-identified conservative Christian Americans so completely committed to precisely the opposite approach where the American State is concerned?

The answer isn’t tricky or hard to find. It’s super simple and shining brightly for all to see.

It’s idolatry.

Stark-raving idolatry.

State-promoted and State-serving idolatry. (Well done, public schools!)

We’ve made the American State our god in practice, trusting in it as the ultimate definer, provider, and sustainer of freedom, liberty, privacy, prosperity, and security here on earth…which is why we’re losing all of those things hand over fist, of course.

These are things to think about the next time we’re prompted to pledge and sing on cue like trained chimps.

The Founding Fathers dared to ask questions – uncomfortable and challenging questions.

The Founding Fathers dared to measure things like liberty, freedom, and privacy by objective standards over and against the propaganda of the State above them.

Then they acted accordingly…which is precisely why the modern American State doesn’t want us to think about these things.
Is it ever okay to refuse to salute (or sing or pledge) to the U.S. flag?
http://www.firebreathingchristian.com/archives/15735


Little children, keep yourselves from idols.

~ 1 John 5:21

Is it ever okay to refuse to salute the U.S. flag?

Is it ever okay to refuse to sing the U.S. national anthem?

Is it ever okay, or maybe even proper, to refuse to take pledges of loyalty to the indivisible power of whatever State rules at any given time? Is it ever wise to embrace the notion of such indivisible power? (See: Would the Founding Fathers say the Pledge of Allegiance?)

Is it okay to think or maybe even ask such questions out loud in "the land of the free" and the home of the NSA? Will good, freedom-loving Americans welcome such questions? Or will they recoil from them and try to wish or ignore them away?

Which sort of response indicates a healthy, mature, wise people capable of discussing and preserving true freedom? And which response indicates a shallow veneer of pseudo-patriotism being used to cover for weak, lazy, and easily manipulated minds?

What does today's emotion-driven rambling about flags, songs, and pledges tell us about whether we're heading toward more true freedom, liberty, and justice in America, or whether we're continuing our loooooooong State-managed march away from these things?

While we're kicking these ideas around, I'd like to share a little bit of important American history that most Americans don't know about the U.S. flag, U.S. public schools, and the U.S. Pledge of Allegiance.

Let's kick of this little stroll down a near-universally avoided stretch of Memory Lane by taking in some pictures from U.S. history of U.S. kids saluting the U.S. flag in (and around) U.S. schools:

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I could literally go on and on with these. There are many similar shots from U.S. public school history to share.

And why?

Because the now-infamous Socialist salute was a standard accessory for U.S. children while taking the U.S. pledge to the U.S. flag in U.S. government run schools, as late as the 1940s, when, for obvious reasons, the Socialist salute became a little uncomfortable by way of association with a particular flavor of Socialism - the National Socialism (Nazism) of Hitler's Germany.

How could this have happened? Why would we here in "the land of the free" and the home of the NSA ever have considered doing such a thing?

Because long before Hitler fanned the flames of his brand of national Socialism, we fanned the flame of ours, and nobody fanned those flames more purposefully than Francis Bellamy, the Socialist who wrote the U.S. Pledge of Allegiance.

Please don't skip over the significance of that last line there: The Socialist who wrote the U.S. Pledge of Allegiance.

Let it soak in.

Deep.

Yes, a flaming Socialist wrote The Pledge that so many "conservative Christens" cherish and defend like a spit-shined golden calf of their very own these days in America.

Think about that for a while, please.

And don't get mad at me for pointing this stuff out, okay? These are facts. This is history.

All that should really matter is whether these things are true or not, right?

And they are.

The U.S. Pledge of Allegiance was written by a Socialist in the late 1800s for the purpose of promoting the sale and use of U.S. flags in government schools, using The Pledge in conjunction with The Flag to instill in the minds of the young a devotion to the indivisible power of the American State above them.

Please let that soak in, too: The U.S. Pledge of Allegiance was written by a Socialist in the late 1800s for the purpose of promoting the sale and use of U.S. flags in government schools, using The Pledge in conjunction with The Flag to instill in the minds of the young a devotion to the indivisible power of the American State above them.

I hate to be so repetitive, but, honestly, 99% of self-identified "conservatives" in America have such an amazing capacity to ignore this kind of thing that I feel compelled to spell it out again and again.

Okay, moving on...

With the big giant flaming neon-lit link of Socialism established between the national Socialism of Germany in the mid-twentieth century and the American version of Socialism here in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, let's consider a famous photo of what Americans tend to champion (and rightfully so) as a remarkably inspiring example of going against the flow of a culture gone mad around you:

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This shot of a man refusing to give the Socialist salute even while the crowd all around him is doing so has been hailed as a sterling example of what a thinking, principled man ought to look like in a crowd of State-programmed drones. The picture has become iconic, and for good reason.

This stirring example of a single brave man standing against the patriotic Socialist tide around him is what inspired us to craft the following:

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We did this to provoke in a good and productive way. We did it to inspire thought. We did it to challenge assumptions and expose lies. We did it to help wake Americans up to glaring realities that have been avoided for far too long. We did it to inspire important questions and the serious pursuit the answers to those questions.

Questions like: Is the Socialist-written Pledge of Allegiance to the United States somehow less Socialist because it's wrapped in the American flag?

We need to think about these things...and act accordingly.

We need to be like the brave man in the Nazi rally photo.

And maybe like the little boy in the other shot, too.
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