Concord

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notmartha
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Concord

Post by notmartha » Mon May 22, 2017 12:08 pm

Also see Agreement.


BIBLE

KJV

The word “concord” is found in the New Testament 1 time, translated from the Greek word symphōnēsis, Strong’s #4857, in the following verse:
2 Corinthians 6:14-18 (KJV)
Be ye not unequally yoked together with unbelievers: for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness? And what concord hath Christ with Belial? or what part hath he that believeth with an infidel? And what agreement hath the temple of God with idols? for ye are the temple of the living God; as God hath said, I will dwell in them, and walk in them; and I will be their God, and they shall be my people. Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive you, And will be a Father unto you, and ye shall be my sons and daughters, saith the Lord Almighty.
DEFINITIONS

Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language, 1828
CONCORD, noun [Latin , the heart. See Accord.]
1. Agreement between persons; union in opinions, sentiments, views or interests; peace; harmony.
What concord hath Christ with Belial? 2 Corinthians 6:15.
2. Agreement between things; suitableness; harmony.
If, natures concord broke, among the constellations war were sprung.
3. In music, consent of sounds; harmony; the relation between tow or more sounds which are agreeable to the ear. [See Chord.]
The man who hath not music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treasons.
4. A compact; an agreement by stipulation; treaty.
5. In law, an agreement between the parties in a fine, made by leave of the court. This is an acknowledgment from the deforciants that the land in question is the right of the complainant.
6. In grammar, agreement of words in construction; as adjectives with nouns in gender, number and case; or verbs with nouns or pronouns in number and person. Or concord may signify the system of rules for construction called syntax.
Form of concord in ecclesiastical history, is a book among the Lutherans containing a system of doctrines to be subscribed as a condition of communion, composed at Torgaw in 1576.
Bouvier’s Law Dictionary, 1856
CONCORD, estates, conveyances, practice.

An agreement or supposed agreement between the parties in levying a fine of lands, in which the deforciant (or he who keeps the other out of possession,) acknowledges that the lands in question, are the right of the complainant;. and from the acknowledgment or recognition of right thus made, the party who levies the fine is called the cognisor, and the person to whom it is levied, the cognisee. 2 Bl. Com. 350; Cruise, Dig. tit. 35, c. 2, s. 33; Com. Dig. Fine, E 9.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 1st Edition, 1891
CONCORD.

In the old process of levying a fine of lands, the concord was an agreement between the parties (real or feigned) in which the deforciant (or he who keeps the other out of possession) acknowledges that the 1ands In question are the right of complainant: and, from the acknowledgment or admission of right thus made, the party who levies the fine is called the “cognizor” and the person to whom it is levied the “cognizee.” 2 Bl. Comm. 350.

The term also denotes an agreement between two persons, one of whom has a right of action against the other, settling what amends shall he made for the breach or wrong: a compromise or an accord.

In old practice. An agreement between two or more, upon a trespass committed, by way of amends or satisfaction for it. Plowd. 5, 6, 8.

The Century Dictionary, an Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language, 1895
concord cent.JPG
concord cent.JPG (101.97 KiB) Viewed 1393 times
Black’s Law Dictionary, 4th Edition, 1968
CONCORD. In the old process of levying a fine of lands, the concord was an agreement between the parties (real or feigned) in which the deforciant (or he who keeps the other out of possession) acknowledges that the lands in question are the right of complainant; and, from the acknowledgment or admission of right thus made, the party who levies the fine is called the "cognizor," and the person to whom it is levied the "cognizee." 2 Bl.Comm. 350.

The term also denotes an agreement between two persons, one of whom has a right of action against the other, settling what amends shall be made for the breach or wrong; a compromise or an accord.

Old Practice
An agreement between two or more, upon a trespass committed, by way of amends or satisfaction for it. Plowd. 5, 6, 8.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 5th Edition, 1979
Concord

An agreement between two persons, one of whom has a right to action against the other, settling what amends shall be made for the breach or wrong. A compromise or an accord.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 7th Edition, 1999
Concord
1. An amicable arrangement between parties, esp. between peoples or nations; a compact or treaty.
2. Archaic. An agreement to compromise and settle an action in trespass.
3. Archaic. An in-court agreement in which a person who acquired land by force acknowledges that the land in question belongs to the complainant.
4. The settlement of a dispute.
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