Road

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notmartha
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Road

Post by notmartha » Fri Oct 21, 2016 12:46 pm

KJV References

Pāshaṭ, Hebrew Strong's #6584, is used 43 times in the Old Testament. It is translated 16 different ways, including strip (13), put off (6), flay (4), invasion, spread, made a road. It is translated as “made a road” in the following verse:
1 Samuel 27:10 - And Achish said, Whither have ye made a road to day? And David said, Against the south of Judah, and against the south of the Jerahmeelites, and against the south of the Kenites.

Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language, 1828
ROAD, noun [Latin gradior. See Grade.]

1. An open way or public passage; ground appropriated for travel, forming a communication between one city, town or place and another. The word is generally applied to highways, and as a generic term it includes highway, street and lane. The military roads of the Romans were paved with stone, or formed of gravel or pebbles, and some of them remain to this day entire.
2. A place where ships may ride at anchor at some distance from the shore; sometimes called roadstead, that is, a place for riding, meaning at anchor.
3. A journey. [Not used, but we still use ride as a noun; as a long ride; a short ride; the same word differently written.]
4. An inroad; incursion of an enemy. [Not in use.]
On the road passing; traveling.

Bouvier’s Law Dictionary, 1856

ROAD.

1. A passage through the country for the use of the people. 3 Yeates, 421.

2. Roads are public or private. Public roads are laid out by public author ity, or dedicated by individuals to public use. The public have the use of such roads, but the owner of the land over which they are made and the owners of land bounded on the highway, have, prima facie, a fee in such highway, ad medium filum vice, subject to the easement in favor of the public. 1 Conn. 193; 11 Conn. 60; 2 John. 357 15 John. 447. But where the boundary excludes the highway, it is, of course, excluded. 11 Pick. 193. See 13 Mass. 259. The proprietor of the soil, is therefore entitled to all the fruits which grow by its side; 16 Mass. 366, 7; and to all the mineral wealth it contains. 1 Rolle, 392, 1. 5; 4 Day, R. 328; 1 Conn'. Rep, 103; 6 Mass. R. 454; 4 Mass, R. 427; 15 Johns. Rep. 447, 583; 2 Johns. R. 357; Com. Dig. Chimin, A 2; 6 Pet. 498; 1 Sumn. 21; 10 Pet. 25; 6 Pick. 57; 6 Mass. 454; 12 Wend. 98.


3. There are public roads, such as turnpikes and railroads, which are constructed by public authority, or by corporations. These are kept in good order by the respective companies to which they belong, and persons travelling on them, with animals and vehicles, are required to pay toll. In general these companies have only a right of passage over the land, which remains the property, subject to the easement, of the owner at the time the road was made or of his heirs or assigns.

4. Private roads are, such as are used for private individuals only, and are not wanted for the public generally. Sometimes roads of this kind are wanted for the accommodation of land otherwise enclosed and without access to public roads. The soil of such roads belongs to the owner of the land over which they are made.

5. Public roads are kept in repair at the public expense, and private roads by those who use them. Vide Domain; Way. 13 Mass. 256; 1 Sumn. Rep. 21; 2 Hill. Ab. c. 7; 1 Pick. R. 122; 2 Mass. R. 127 6 Mass. R. 454; 4 Mass. R. 427; 15 Mass. Rep. 33; 3 Rawle, R. 495; 1 N. H. Rep. 16; 1 M'Cord, R. 67; 1 Conn. R. 103; 2 John. R. 357; 1 John. Rep. 447; 15 John. R. 483; 4 Day, Rep. 330; 2 Bailey, Rep. 271; 1 Burr. 133; 7 B. & Cr. 304; 11 Price R. 736; 7 Taunt. R. 39; Str. 1004. 1 Shepl. R. 250; 5 Conn. Rep. 528; 8 Pick. R. 473; Crabb, R. P. §§102 104.

ROAD, mar. law.

A road is defined by Lord Hale to be an open passage of the sea, which, from the situation of the adjacent land, and its own depth and wideness, affords a secure place for the common riding and anchoring of vessels. Hale de Port. Mar. p. 2, c. 2. This word, however, does not appear to have a very definite meaning. 2 Chit. Com. Law, 4, 5.

U.S. Constitution, Article 1, Section 8
The Congress shall have power...
To establish post offices and post roads;

Black’s Law Dictionary, 1st edition, 1891
road blacks 1.JPG
road blacks 1.JPG (101.89 KiB) Viewed 2877 times

Encyclopedia Britannica, 1958
The Romans developed a network of paved roads for the rapid movement of troops. Roads in the ancient world was evidence of the existence of an authoritarian regime; in fact, the construction of long-distance roads, with their military significance, is the function of any strong central government A road system implies central government over a wide area with power to command labour. The most spectacular road developments in the 19th century were 'in France, under Napoleon, and in the 20th century under Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany.
WEX Legal Dictionary
private road

A road or driveway on privately owned property, limited to the use of the owner or a group of owners who share the use and maintain the road without help from the town, city, county, or state



Robert Frost said it best:
"Two roads diverged in a wood, and I –
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference."
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