Fasces, Fascism

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Re: Fasces, Fascism

Post by notmartha » Wed Jan 03, 2018 2:06 pm

editor wrote:
Wed Jan 03, 2018 2:42 am
For Christmas I received the gift of Dinesh D'Souza's new book, The Big Lie.


This book offers the best description I've ever read of fascism;
How would you summarize D'Souza's definition of fascism?
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Re: Fasces, Fascism

Post by editor » Wed Jan 03, 2018 7:31 pm

It seems to me D'Souza isn't so much concerned with defining fascism as illuminating it.

For example he goes into the writings of Mussolini, and of those who Mussolini considered mentors. Mussolini was a lifelong socialist. Socialism's poster boy Marx, contrary to what most people think, never called for the workers to rise up and revolt-- Marx was simply stating he believed they eventually would rise up of their own accord. By the 1920s most devout socialists had figured out this was never going to happen. Essentially Mussolini fathered fascism as a tactic-- as a means to an end, to bring about socialism. So fascism is really just a branch of socialism, and should never be considered ideologically separate.

In Mussolini's Italy, the means of production was tightly controlled by the State, but people were still allowed to own their homes. Mussolini considered this a temporary compromise. He saw fascism as a tight relationship between all the people and the State. The people should serve the State unconditionally, without regard to individual identity; in return the State would provide for everyone as needed. Of course the State would decide what is needed.

D'Souza makes a clear distinction between the ideology of fascism, and the reality, and points out where compromises were made to further the cause. He also discusses the similarities and differences between fascism and nazism, both of which are simply doctrinal offshoots of socialism; the primary difference being the element of racism in the nazis which is not found in the fascists.

As I said, I haven't finished the book yet, but find it illuminating. I'm currently in the chapter where he compares the nazi euthanasia program with the current progressive fixation on abortion. It comes down to the belief held by some that the selected segment of society is made up of disposable people, a view shared by both Germany's Adolph Hitler and America's Margaret Sanger.
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Re: Fasces, Fascism

Post by notmartha » Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:42 pm

Thanks for the summary, Editor.
editor wrote:
Wed Jan 03, 2018 7:31 pm
I'm currently in the chapter where he compares the nazi euthanasia program with the current progressive fixation on abortion. It comes down to the belief held by some that the selected segment of society is made up of disposable people, a view shared by both Germany's Adolph Hitler and America's Margaret Sanger.
I wonder if he'll mention the highly esteemed O.W. Holmes and his court decisions about eugenics. In the Nuremberg trials the head Nazi eugenicist, Brandt, pointed at Holmes' decisions about forced sterilization of the disposable people. More in this thread: https://www.lawfulpath.com/forum/viewto ... =278#p1485

I'd sum up fascism, and it would seem D'Souza agrees, as doing whatever is expedient to prop up State.
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