Inauguration

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notmartha
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Inauguration

Post by notmartha » Sun Jan 08, 2017 1:20 pm

BIBLE

In the following verse from the Septuagint, “auguries” is translated from the Hebrew transliteration, nāḥash, (Strong’s # 5172) meaning enchantment or divine.

Leviticus 19:26 -
Eat not on the mountains, nor shall ye employ auguries, nor divine by inspection of birds.


- Compare to KJV -
Ye shall not eat any thing with the blood: neither shall ye use enchantment, nor observe times.
In the following verses from the Septuagint “augury” is translated from the Hebrew transliteration qesem, (Strong’s # 7081) meaning divination, oracle, divine sentence, witchcraft.

Deuteronomy 18:10-12 -
There shall not be found in thee one who purges his son or his daughter with fire, one who uses divination, who deals with omens, and augury, a sorcerer employing incantation, one who has in him a divining spirit, and observer of signs, questioning the dead. For every one that does these things is an abomination to the Lord thy God; for because of these abominations the Lord will destroy them from before thy face.
- Compare to KJV -
“There shall not be found among you any one that maketh his son or his daughter to pass through the fire, or that useth divination, or an observer of times, or an enchanter, or a witch, Or a charmer, or a consulter with familiar spirits, or a wizard, or a necromancer. For all that do these things are an abomination unto the LORD: and because of these abominations the LORD thy God doth drive them out from before thee.
Jeremias14:14 -
Then the Lord said to me, The prophets prophesy lies in my name: I sent them not, and I commanded them not, and I spoke not to them: for they prophesy to you false visions, and divinations, and auguries, and devices of their own heart.
- Compare to KJV –
“Then the LORD said unto me, The prophets prophesy lies in my name: I sent them not, neither have I commanded them, neither spake unto them: they prophesy unto you a false vision and divination, and a thing of nought, and the deceit of their heart.”
In the following verse from the Septuagint “auguries” is translated from the Hebrew transliteration ʿānan, (Strong’s # 6049) meaning observer of times, soothsayer, enchanter.

Jeremias 27:9 -
And hearken ye not to your false prophets, nor to them that divine to you, nor to them that foretell events by dreams to you, nor to your auguries, nor your sorcerers, that say, Ye shall by no means work for the king of Babylon:


- Compare to KJV –
“Therefore hearken not ye to your prophets, nor to your diviners, nor to your dreamers, nor to your enchanters, nor to your sorcerers, which speak unto you, saying, Ye shall not serve the king of Babylon:”
Complete Works of Flavius Josephus, Translated by William Whiston
I will add further what he says he learned when he was himself with the same army, concerning the actions of a man that was a Jew. His words are these: "As I was myself going to the Red Sea, there followed us a man, whose name was Mosollam; he was one of the Jewish horsemen who conducted us; he was a person of great courage, of a strong body, and by all allowed to be the most skillful archer that was either among the Greeks or barbarians. Now this man, as people were in great numbers passing along the road, and a certain augur was observing an augury by a bird, and requiring them all to stand still, inquired what they staid for. Hereupon the augur showed him the bird from whence he took his augury, and told him that if the bird staid where he was, they ought all to stand still; but that if he got up, and flew onward, they must go forward; but that if he flew backward, they must retire again. Mosollam made no reply, but drew his bow, and shot at the bird, and hit him, and killed him; and as the augur and some others were very angry, and wished imprecations upon him, he answered them thus: Why are you so mad as to take this most unhappy bird into your hands? for how can this bird give us any true information concerning our march, who could not foresee how to save himself? for had he been able to foreknow what was future, he would not have come to this place, but would have been afraid lest Mosollam the Jew should shoot at him, and kill him."
DEFINITIONS

Webster’s Dictionary, 1828
AU'GUR, noun [Latin augur The first syllable is from avis, a fowl; but the meaning and origin of the last syllable are not obvious.]
1. Among the Romans, an officer whose duty was to foretell future events by the singing, chattering, flight and feeding of birds. There was a college or community of augers, originally three in number, and afterwards nine, four patricians, and five plebeians. They bore a staff or wand, and were held in great respect.
2. One who pretends to foretell future events by omens.
We all know that augur cannot look at augur without laughing.

AU'GUR, verb intransitive To guess; to conjecture by signs or omens; to prognosticate.

AU'GUR, verb transitive To predict or foretell; as, to augur ill success.

INAUG'URAL, adjective [Latin inauguro; in and augur.]
1. Pertaining to inauguration; as inaugural ceremonies.
2. Made or pronounced at an inauguration; as an inaugural address.

INAUGURA'TION, noun The act of inducting into office with solemnity; investiture with office by appropriate ceremonies.

INAUG'URATE, verb transitive [supra.] To introduce or induct into an office with solemnity or suitable ceremonies; to invest with an office in a formal manner; a word borrowed from the ceremonies used by the Romans when they were received into the college of augurs. Kings and emperors are inaugurated by coronation; a prelate, by consecration; and the president of a college by such ceremonies and forms as give weight and authority to the transaction.
1. To begin with good omens. [Not used.]

INAUG'URATE, adjective Invested with office.

INAUG'URATORY, adjective Suited to induction into office; pertaining to inauguration; as inauguratory gratulations.
Bouvier’s Dictionary of Law, 1856
INAUGURATION.

This word was applied by the Romans to the ceremony of dedicating some temple, or raising some man to the priesthood, after the augurs had been consulted. It was afterwards applied to the installation (q. v.) of the emperors, kings, and prelates, in imitation of the ceremonies of the Romans when they entered into the temple of the augurs. It is applied in the United States to the installation of the chief magistrate of the republic, and of the governors of the several states.
The Century Dictionary, an Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language, 1895
inaugurate (in-a'gu-rat),

practice augury, divine, consecrate or install into office with augural ceremonies,

1. To introduce or induct into office with suitable ceremonies; invest formally with an office.

2. To make a formal beginning of; put in action or operation ; initiate, especially something of dignity or importance: as, to inaugurate a reform.

3. To institute or initiate the use of, especially by some formal opening ceremony: as, to inaugurate a railroad, a public building, or a statue.
Blacks’ Law Dictionary, 1st Edition, 1899
INAUGURATION.

The act of installing or inducting into office with formal ceremonies, as the coronation of a sovereign. The inauguration of a president or governor, or the consecration of a prelate.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 2nd Edition, 1910
INAUGURATION.

The act of installing or inducting into office with formal ceremonies, as the coronation of a sovereign, the inauguration of a president or governor, or the consecration of a prelate.
Ballentine’s Law Dictionary, James A. Ballentine, Third Edition, 1969
inauguration.

The installation into office of a person elected or appointed to a high office of state. Making a beginning: putting into effect.

Inauguration Day.

The day, January 20. following their election, for the inauguration of the President and Vice President of the United States. The day fixed by law of a state for the inauguration of the Governor.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 4th Edition, 1968, 5th Edition, 1979, 6th Edition, 1991
INAUGURATION.

The act of installing or inducting into office with formal ceremonies, as the coronation of a sovereign, the inauguration of a president or governor, or the consecration of a prelate. A word applied by the Romans to the ceremony of dedicating a temple, or raising a man to the priesthood, after the augurs had been consulted.


Last bumped by notmartha on Sun Jan 08, 2017 1:20 pm.
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