Subsidiarity

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notmartha
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Subsidiarity

Post by notmartha » Fri Sep 25, 2015 11:28 am

Word of the day…”subsidiarity:)

Yesterday, in the pope’s speech in Washington, D.C. -
“Building a future of freedom requires love of the common good and cooperation in a spirit of subsidiarity and solidarity.”
“Building a nation calls us to recognize that we must constantly relate to others, rejecting a mindset of hostility in order to adopt one of reciprocal subsidiarity, in a constant effort to do our best.”
From http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/subsidiarity
subsidiarity noun sub•sid•i•ar•i•ty \ˌsəb-si-dē-ˈer-ə-tē, səb-ˌsi-\
Definition of SUBSIDIARITY
1: the quality or state of being subsidiary
2: a principle in social organization: functions which subordinate or local organizations perform effectively belong more properly to them than to a dominant central organization
First Known Use of SUBSIDIARITY
1936
From http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/subsidiarity
subsidiarity /səbˌsɪdɪˈærɪtɪ/ noun
1. (in the Roman Catholic Church) a principle of social doctrine that all social bodies exist for the sake of the individual so that what individuals are able to do, society should not take over, and what small societies can do, larger societies should not take over
2. (in political systems) the principle of devolving decisions to the lowest practical level

Word Origin and History for subsidiarity
n. 1936, from German Subsidiarität, paraphrasing the Latin of Pius XI in his Quadragesimo Anno of 1931; see subsidiary + -ity.
Just as it is gravely wrong to take from individuals what they can accomplish by their own initiative and industry and give it to the community, so also it is an injustice and at the same time a grave evil and disturbance of right order to assign to a greater and higher association what lesser and subordinate organizations can do. For every social activity ought of its very nature to furnish help to the members of the body social, and never destroy and absorb them. [Pius XI, Quadragesimo Anno, 1931]


From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subsidiar ... tholicism)
The principle of subsidiarity was first formally developed in the encyclical Rerum novarum of 1891 by Pope Leo XIII, as an attempt to articulate a middle course between laissez-faire capitalism on the one hand and the various forms of communism, which subordinate the individual to the state, on the other.
Webster’s 1828 -
SUBSID'IARY, adjective [Latin subsidiarius. See Subsidy.]

1. Aiding; assistant; furnishing help. subsidiary troops are troops of one nation hired by another for military service.

2. Furnishing additional supplies; as a subsidiary stream.
SUBSID'IARY, noun An assistant; an auxiliary; he or that which contributes aid or additional supplies.
SUB'SIDY, noun [Latin subsidium, from subsido, literally to be or sit under or by.]
1. Aid in money; supply given; a tax; something furnished for aid, as by the people to their prince; as the subsidies granted formerly to the kings of England.
Subsidies were a tax, not immediately on property, but on persons in respect of their reputed estates, after the nominal rate of 4s. the pound for lands, and 2 Samuel 8:1d. for goods.
2. A sum of money paid by one prince or nation to another, to purchase the service of auxiliary troops, or the aid of such foreign prince in a war against an enemy. Thus Great Britain paid subsidies to Austria and Prussia, to engage them to resist the progress of the French.
SUB'SIDIZING, participle present tense Purchasing the assistance of by subsidies.
SUB'SIDIZED, participle passive Engaged as an auxiliary by means of a subsidy.
SUB'SIDIZE, verb transitive [from subsidy.] To furnish with a subsidy; to purchase the assistance of another by the payment of a subsidy to him. Great Britain subsidized some of the German powers in the late war with France.
SUBSI'DE, verb intransitive [Latin subsido; sub and sido, to settle. See Set.]

1. To sink or fall to the bottom; to settle; as lees.

2. To fall into a state of quiet; to cease to rage; to be calmed; to become tranquil. Let the passions subside The tumults of war will subside Christ commanded, and the storm subsided.

3. To tend downwards; to sink; as a subsiding hill. The land subsides into a plain.

4. To abate; to be reduced.

In cases of danger, pride and envy naturally subside
Bouvier’s 1856
SUBSIDY, Engl. law. An aid, tax or tribute granted by parliament to the king for the urgent occasions of the kingdom, to be levied on every subject of ability, according to the value of his lands or goods. Jacob's Law. Dict. h. t.
2. The assistance given in money by one nation to another to enable it the better to carry on a war, when such nation does not join directly in the war, is called a subsidy. Vattel, liv. 3, §82. See Neutrality.
Black's 1st edition:
SUBSIDY.

In English law. An aid, tax, or tribute granted by parliament to the king for the urgent occasions of the kingdom, to be levied on every subject of ability, according to the value of his lands or goods. Jacob.

In American law. A grant of money made by government in aid of the promoters of any enterprise, work, or improvement in which the government desires to participate, or which is considered a proper subject for state aid, because likely to be of benefit to the public.

In international law. The assistance given in money by one nation to another to enable it the better to carry on a war, when such nation does not join directly in the war. Vattel, bk. 3, § 82.
WEX Legal Dictionary
Subsidiary
An entity (e.g., a corporation) in which another entity has a controlling share.
Interesting, in light of the fact that this pope is being touted as the "prince of peace".

Ezekiel 13:10 (KJV)
10 Because, even because they have seduced my people, saying, Peace; and there was no peace;

1 Thessalonians 5:2-5 (KJV)
For yourselves know perfectly that the day of the Lord so cometh as a thief in the night. For when they shall say, Peace and safety; then sudden destruction cometh upon them, as travail upon a woman with child; and they shall not escape.
But ye, brethren, are not in darkness, that that day should overtake you as a thief. Ye are all the children of light, and the children of the day: we are not of the night, nor of darkness.
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