Insurrection / Insurgent

Comprehending laws and contracts is impossible, unless we first learn the meaning of the words and phrases they contain.

Moderator: notmartha

Post Reply
User avatar
notmartha
Posts: 799
Joined: Mon Jul 22, 2013 1:16 pm

Insurrection / Insurgent

Post by notmartha »

Since this term "insurrection" is being thrown around by the media as of late, thought some may want to know its actual meaning, so a protest with a false flag overlay is not confused with an "insurrection"...

BIBLE

Hebrew Strong's #5376, neśāʾ, is found 3 times in the OT. It is translated as carry away (1), take (1), and make insurrection (1) in the following verse:
Ezra 4:19 - And I commanded, and search hath been made, and it is found that this city of old time hath made insurrection against kings, and that rebellion and sedition have been made therein.
Hebrew Strong's #7285, regesh, is found 2 times in the OT, translated as company (1) and
insurrection (1) in the following verse:
Psalm 64:2 - Hide me from the secret counsel of the wicked; from the insurrection of the workers of iniquity:
Greek Strong's #4955, systasiastēs, is found 1 time in the NT, translated as “make insurrection with” in the following verse:
Mark 15:7 - And there was one named Barabbas, which lay bound with them that had made insurrection with him, who had committed murder in the insurrection.
Greek Strong's #4714, stasis, is found 9 times in the NT, translated as sedition (3), dissension (3), uproar (1), standing (1), and insurrection (1) in the following verse:
Mark 15:7 - And there was one named Barabbas, which lay bound with them that had made insurrection with him, who had committed murder in the insurrection.
Greek Strong's #2721, katephistamai, is found 1 time in the NT, translated as “make insurrection against” in the following verse:
Acts 18:12 - And when Gallio was the deputy of Achaia, the Jews made insurrection with one accord against Paul, and brought him to the judgment seat,
DEFINITIONS

Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language, 1828
INSURG'ENT, adjective [Latin insurgens; in and surgo, to rise.]
In opposition to lawful civil or political authority; as insurgent chiefs.
INSURG'ENT, noun
A person who rises in opposition to civil or political authority; one who openly and actively resists the execution of laws. [See Insurrection.] An insurgent differs from a rebel. The insurgent opposes the execution of a particular law or laws; the rebel attempts to overthrow or change the government, or he revolts and attempts to place his country under another jurisdiction. All rebels are insurgents, but all insurgents are not rebels.
INSURREC'TION, noun [Latin insurgo; in and surgo, to rise.]
1. A rising against civil or political authority; the open and active opposition of a number of persons to the execution of a law in a city or state. It is equivalent to sedition, except that sedition expresses a less extensive rising of citizens. It differs from rebellion, for the latter expresses a revolt, or an attempt to overthrow the government, to establish a different one or to place the country under another jurisdiction. It differs from mutiny, as it respects the civil or political government; whereas a mutiny is an open opposition to law in the army or navy. insurrection is however used with such latitude as to comprehend either sedition or rebellion.
It is found that this city of old time hath made insurrection against kings, and that rebellion and sedition have been made therein. Ezra 4:19.
2. A rising in mass to oppose an enemy. [Little Used.]
Bouvier’s Law Dictionary, 1856
INSURGENT.

One who is concerned in an insurrection. He differs from a rebel in this, that rebel is always understood in a bad sense, or one who unjustly opposes the constituted authorities; insurgent may be one who justly opposes the tyranny of constituted authorities. The colonists who opposed the tyranny of the English government were insurgents, not rebels.
INSURRECTION.

1. A rebellion of citizens or subjects of a country against its government.
2. The Constitution of the United States, art. 1, s. 8. gives power to congress " to provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the Union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions."
3. By the act of Congress of the 28th of February, 1795, 1 Story's L. U. S. 389, it is provided: §1. That whenever the United States shall be invaded, or be in imminent danger of invasion, from any foreign nation or Indian tribe, it shall be lawful for the president of the United States to call forth such number, of the militia of the state, or states, most convenient to the place of danger, or scene of action, as he may judge necessary to repel such invasion, and to issue his orders, for that purpose, to such officer or officers of the militia as be shall think proper. And in case of an insurrection in any state, against the government thereof, it shall be lawful for the president of the United States, on application of the legislature of such state, or of the executive, (when the legislature cannot be convened,) to call forth such number of the militia of any other state or states, as may be applied for, as he may judge sufficient to suppress such insurrection.
4. §2 That, whenever the laws of the United States shall be opposed, or the execution thereof obstructed, in any state, by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, or by the powers vested in the marshals by this act, it shall be lawful for the president of the United States to call forth the militia of such state, or of any other state or states, as may be necessary to suppress such combinations, and to cause the laws to be duly executed; and the use of militia so to be called forth may be continued, if necessary, until the expiration of thirty days after the commencement of the then next session of congress.
5. 3. That whenever it may be necessary, in the judgment of the president, to use the military force hereby directed to be called forth, the president shall forthwith, by proclamation, command such insurgents to disperse, and retire peaceably to their respective abodes, within a limited time.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 1st Edition, 1891
INSURRECTION.

A rebellion, or rising of citizens or subjects in resistance to their government. See INSURGENT.
Insurrection shall consist in any combined resistance to the lawful authority of the state, with intent to the denial thereof, when the same is manifested, or intended to be manifested, by acts of violence. Code Ga. 1882, § 4315.
INSURGENT.

One who participates in an insurrection; one who opposes the execution of law by force of arms, or who rises in revolt against the constituted authorities. A distinction is often taken between “insurgent " and “rebel, " in this: that the former term is not necessarily to be taken in a bad sense, inasmuch as an insurrection, though extralegal, may be just and timely in itself; as where it is undertaken for the overthrow of tyranny or the reform of gross abuses. According to Webster, an insurrection is an incipient or early stage of a rebellion.
The Century Dictionary, an Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language, 1895
insurgent (in-ser'jent)

I, a. Rising against lawful authority or established government; engaged in insurrection or rebellion: as, insurgent chiefs.
II. n. One who rises in forcible opposition to lawful authority ; one who engages in armed resistance to a government or to the execution of laws.

= Syn. Insurgent, Rebel, Traitor. An insurgent differs from a rebel chiefly in degree. The insurgent opposes the execution of a particular law or scheme of laws, or the carrying out of some particular measure, or he wishes to make a demonstration in favor of some measure or to express discontent; the rebel attempts to overthrow or change the government, or he revolts and attempts to place his country under another jurisdiction. A traitor is one who breaks faith or trust by betraying his country or violating his allegiance, especially a sworn allegiance: the word is applied in strong reprobation to one who, even without express breach of faith, makes war upon his sovereign or country, or goes over from the side to which his loyalty is due. See insurrection.
insurrection (in-su-rek'shon),

I. A rising up; uprising.
2. The act of rising against civil authority or governmental restraint; specifically, the armed resistance of a number of persons to the power of the state; incipient or limited rebellion.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 2nd Edition, 1910
INSURGENT.

One who participates in an insurrection ; one who opposes the execution of law by force of arms, or who rises In revolt against the constituted authorities. A distinction is often taken between "insurgent" and "rebel," in this: that the former term is not necessarily to be taken in a bad sense, inasmuch as an insurrection, though extralegal, may be just and timely in itself ; as where it is undertaken for the overthrow of tyranny or the reform of gross abuses. According to Webster, an insurrection is an incipient or early stage of a rebellion.
INSURRECTION.

A rebellion, or rising of citizens or subjects in resistance to their government. See Insurgent. Insurrection shall consist in any combined resistance to the lawful authority of the state, with intent to the denial thereof, when the same is manifested, or intended to be manifested, by acts of violence. Code Ga. 1882, jj 4315. And see Allegheny County v. Gibson, 90 Pa. 417, 35 Am. Rep. 670; Boon v. ./Etna Ins. Co., 40 Conn. 584; In re Charge to Grand Jury (D. C.) 62 Fed. 830.
Ballentine’s Law Dictionary, James A. Ballentine, Third Edition, 1969
insurgent.

A person who engages with others in an insurrection; partaking of or relating to an insurrection. A term of politics for a member of a party who goes against the leadership either in advocacy of principle or in an attempt to overthrow the leadership.
insurrection.

A rising against civil or political authority, more than a mob or riot, sometimes amounting to a rebellion, at least, an incipient or limited rebellion. Gitlow v Kiely (DC NY) 44 F2d 227. affd (CA2) 49 F2d 1077. cert den 284 US 648. 76 L Ed 550. 52 S Ct 29: County of Allegheny v Gibson. 90 Pa 397.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 4th Edition, 1968
INSURGENT.

One who participates in an insurrection; one who opposes the execution of law by force of arms, or who rises in revolt against the constituted authorities. Hearon v. Calus, 178 S.C. 381, 183 S.E. 13. 20. A distinction is often taken between "insurgent" and "rebel," in this : that the former term is not necessarily to be taken in a bad sense, inasmuch as an insurrection, though extralegal, may be just and timely in itself ; as where it is undertaken for the overthrow of tyranny or the reform of gross abuses.
INSURRECTION.

A rebellion, or rising of citizens or subjects in resistance to their government. See Insurgent.
Insurrection shall consist in any combined resistance to the lawful authority of the state, with intent to the denial thereof, when the same is manifested, or intended to be manifested, by acts of violence. Allegheny County v. Gibson, 90 Pa. 417, 35 Am. Rep. 670 ,
Black’s Law Dictionary, 5th Edition, 1979
Insurgent.

One who participates in an insurrection; one who opposes the execution of law by force of arms, or who rises in revolt against the constituted authorities. An enemy.
Insurrection.

A rebellion, or rising of citizens or subjects in resistance to their government. Insurrection consists in any combined resistance to the lawful authority of the state, with intent to cause the denial thereof, when the same is manifested, or intended to be manifested, by acts of violence. It is a federal crime to incite, assist, or engage in a rebellion or insurrection against the United States. 18 V.S.C.A. § 2383. See also Internal security acts.
DOD Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms, 2017
insurgency —

The organized use of subversion and violence to seize, nullify, or challenge political control of a region. Insurgency can also refer to the group itself.
United States Government Compendium of Interagency and Associated Terms, 2017
insurgency –

Insurgency is the organized use of subversion and violence to seize, nullify or challenge political control of a region. It is a primarily a political and territorial struggle, in which both sides use armed force to create space for their political, economic, and influence activities to be effective.
Insurgency is not always conducted by a single group with a centralized, military-style command structure, but may involve different actors with various aims, loosely connected in networks.
MISCELLANEOUS CITATIONS

Clark's Criminal Law (1915), p. 471, citing 3 Whart.Cr.Law (11th Ed.), §2147.
"To constitute treason by adhering to the enemies of the United States, the enemy must be a hostile foreign power, and not merely citizens of the United States engaged in a rebellion or insurrection against them, for they are still citizens, and not enemies, within the meaning of the Constitution."
Franklin v. State Board of Examiners (1863), 23 C. 173.
"The Constitution does not impose any limitation upon the amount of State indebtedness which may be created by the Legislature in case of war, to repel invasion or suppress insurrection."
"The political department of the State Government is the sole judge of the existence of war or insurrection; and when it declares either of these emergencies to exist, its action is not subject to review, or liable to be controlled by the judicial department."
Horn v. Lockhart (1877), 17 Wall. 570, cited in Williams v. Bruffy (1877), 96 U.S. 176, 192.
"The existence of a state of insurrection and war did not loosen the bonds of society, or do away with civil government or the regular administration of the laws. Order was to be preserved, police regulations maintained, crimes prosecuted, property protected, contracts enforced, marriages celebrated, estates settled, and the transfer and descent of property regulated, precisely as in time of peace. No one, that we are aware of, seriously questions the validity of judicial or legislative acts in the insurrectionary States touching these and kindred subjects, where they were not hostile in their purpose or mode of enforcement to the authority of the national government, and did not impair the rights of citizens under the Constitution."
Jones v. Seward (1863), 40 Barb.(N.Y.) 563, 3 Grant's Cases (Penn.) 431.
"The president of the United States, whether in his civil capacity or as commander-in-chief of the army and navy [a military character], has no power during an insurrection to arrest or authorize another to arrest any person not subject to military law without any order or process of some court of competent jurisdiction."
Thorington v. Smith, 8 Wall. 1; Sprott v. U. S., 20 Wall. 464.
"The Confederate government was never acknowledged by the United States as a de facto government in the sense that adherents to it in war against the government de jure did not incur the penalties of treason. From a very early period of the Civil War to its close, it was regarded as simply the military representative of the insurrection against the authority of the United States."
U.S. v. Greathouse (1863), 2 Abb.(U.S.) 372, per Field, J.
"The term 'enemies,' as used in the second clause, according to its settled meaning at the time the Constitution was adopted, applies only to the subjects of a foreign power in a state of open hostility with us. It does not embrace rebels in insurrection against their own government. An enemy is always the subject of a foreign power who owes no allegiance to our government or country."
QUOTES

Thomas Jefferson:
I am not a friend to a very energetic government. It is always oppressive. It places the governors indeed more at their ease at the expense of the people. The late rebellion in Massachusetts has given much more alarm than I think it should have done. Calculate that one rebellion in thirteen States in the course of eleven years is but one for each State in a century and a half. No country should be so long without one. Nor will any degree of power in the hands of the government prevent insurrections. In England, where the hand of power is heavier than with us, there are seldom half a dozen years without an insurrection. In France, where it is still heavier but less despotic, as Montesquieu supposes, than in some other countries and where there are always two or three hundred thousand men ready to crush insurrections, there have been three in the course of the three years I have been here, in every one of which greater numbers were engaged than in Massachusetts.
Francois Pierre Guizot:
The spirit of revolution, the spirit of insurrection, is a spirit radically opposed to liberty.
Bernard J. Bordonet:
If a state militia guarantee rather than an individual right of citizens to keep and bear arms were the purpose of the second Amendment, it would have been totally unnecessary and irrelevant to include any guarantee of “the right of the people to keep and bear arms,” since by its very nature a militia is necessarily an armed force and without arms it would be impossible to carry out its constitutional functions of suppressing insurrections and repelling invasions.
Thomas Jefferson:
Why suspend the habeas corpus in insurrections and rebellions? Examine the history of England. See how few of the cases of the suspension of the habeas corpus law have been worthy of that suspension. They have been either real treasons, wherein the parties might as well have been charged at once, or sham plots, where it was shameful they should ever have been suspected. Yet for the few cases wherein the suspension of the habeas corpus has done real good, that operation is now become habitual and the minds of the nation almost prepared to live under its constant suspension.


George Washington:
The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissensions, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism.
The disorders and miseries which result gradually incline the minds of men to seek security and repose in the absolute power of an individual; and sooner or later the chief of some prevailing faction, more able or more fortunate than his competitors, turns this disposition to the purposes of his own elevation, on the ruins of Public Liberty.
Without looking forward to an extremity of this kind (which nevertheless ought not to be entirely out of sight), the common and continual mischiefs of the spirit of party are sufficient to make it the interest and duty of a wise people to discourage and restrain it.
It serves always to distract the public councils, and enfeeble the public administration. It agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms; kindles the animosity of one part against another; foments occasionally riot and insurrection. It opens the door to foreign influence and corruption, which find a facilitated access to government itself through the channels of party passions. Thus the policy and the will of one country are subjected to the policy and will of another.
Post Reply