Represent; Representative

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Represent; Representative

Post by notmartha » Sun Jan 15, 2017 2:16 pm

BIBLE

The word “represent” is not found in the KJV. Some instances of the word “represent,” or a derivative, are found in other translations, as follows:

English Standard Version, Crossway Bibles, 2001
Exodus 18:19 - Now obey my voice; I will give you advice, and God be with you! You shall represent the people before God and bring their cases to God,
Numbers 1:44 - These are those who were listed, whom Moses and Aaron listed with the help of the chiefs of Israel, twelve men, each representing his fathers’ house.

Jeremiah 40:10 - As for me, I will dwell at Mizpah, to represent you before the Chaldeans who will come to us. But as for you, gather wine and summer fruits and oil, and store them in your vessels, and dwell in your cities that you have taken.
Weymouth New Testament, Richard Francis Weymouth, 1902
Mark 4:30 - Another saying of His was this: "How are we to picture the Kingdom of God? or by what figure of speech shall we represent it?
John 5:43 - I have come as my Father's representative, and you do not receive me. If some one else comes representing only himself, him you will receive.
Galatians 4:24 - All this is allegorical; for the women represent two Covenants. One has its origin on Mount Sinai, and bears children destined for slavery.
Philemon 1:13 - It was my wish to keep him at my side for him to attend to my wants, as your representative, during my imprisonment for the Good News.
Revelation 5:8 - And when He had taken the book, the four living creatures and the twenty-four Elders fell down before the Lamb, having each of them a harp and bringing golden bowls full of incense, which represent the prayers of God's people.
Revelation 13:17 - in order that no one should be allowed to buy or sell unless he had the mark—either the name of the Wild Beast or the number which his name represents.


Holman Christian Standard Bible, Holman Bible Publishers, 2003
Exodus 18:19 - Now listen to me; I will give you some advice, and God be with you. You be the one to represent the people before God and bring their cases to Him.
Numbers 1:44 - These are the men Moses and Aaron registered, with ⌊the assistance of⌋ the 12 leaders of Israel; each represented his ancestral house.

Numbers 16:2 - 250 prominent Israelite men who were leaders of the community and representatives in the assembly, and they rebelled against Moses.

Numbers 17:8 - The next day Moses entered the tent of the testimony and saw that Aaron’s staff, representing the house of Levi, had sprouted, formed buds, blossomed, and produced almonds!
2 Samuel 3:12 - Abner sent messengers as his representatives to say to David, “Whose land is it? Make your covenant with me, and you can be certain I am on your side to hand all Israel over to you.”
Ezra 10:14 - Let our leaders represent the entire assembly. Then let all those in our towns who have married foreign women come at appointed times, together with the elders and judges of each town, in order to avert the fierce anger of our God concerning this matter.”
Ezra 10:16 - The exiles did what had been proposed. Ezra the priest selected men who were family leaders, all ⌊identified⌋ by name, to represent their ancestral houses. They convened on the first day of the tenth month to investigate the matter,
Jeremiah 40:10 - As for me, I am going to live in Mizpah to represent ⌊you⌋ before the Chaldeans who come to us. As for you, gather wine, summer fruit, and oil, place them in your ⌊storage⌋ jars, and live in the cities you have captured.”
Jeremiah 52:12 - On the tenth day of the fifth month—which was the nineteenth year of King Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon—Nebuzaradan, the commander of the guards, entered Jerusalem as the representative of the king of Babylon.
Ezekiel 23:4 - The older one was named Oholah, and her sister was Oholibah. They became Mine and gave birth to sons and daughters. As for their names, Oholah represents Samaria and Oholibah represents Jerusalem.
Daniel 8:20 - The two-horned ram that you saw represents the kings of Media and Persia.
Daniel 8:21 - The shaggy goat represents the king of Greece, and the large horn between his eyes represents the first king.
Daniel 8:22 - The four horns that took the place of the shattered horn represent four kingdoms. They will rise from that nation, but without its power.
Galatians 4:24 - These things are illustrations, for the women represent the two covenants. One is from Mount Sinai and bears children into slavery—this is Hagar.
Revelation 11:9 - And representatives from the peoples, tribes, languages, and nations will view their bodies for three and a half days and not permit their bodies to be put into a tomb.
Revelation 19:8 - She was given fine linen to wear, bright and pure. For the fine linen represents the righteous acts of the saints.
DEFINITIONS

Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language, 1828
REPRESENT', verb transitive s as z. [Latin repraesento; re and Low Latin praesenter, from praesens, present.]
1. To show or exhibit by resemblance.
Before him burn seven lamps, as in a zodiac, representing the heavenly fires.
2. To describe; to exhibit to the mind in words.
The managers of the bank at Genoa have been represented as a second kind of senate.
3. To exhibit; to show by action; as a tragedy well represented.
4. To personate; to act the character or to fill the place of another in a play; as, to represent the character of king Richard.
5. To supply the place of; to act as a substitute for another. The parliament of Great Britain represents the nation. The congress of the United States represents the people or nation. The senate is considered as representing the states in their corporate capacity.
6. To show by arguments, reasoning or statement of facts. the memorial represents the situation of the petitioner. represent to your son the danger of an idle life or profligate company.
7. To stand in the place of, in the right of inheritance.
All the branches inherit the same share that their root, whom they represent would have done.

REPRESENT'ATIVE, adjective
1. Exhibiting a similitude.
They own the legal sacrifices, though representative to be proper and real.
2. Bearing the character or power of another; as a council representative of the people.

REPRESENT'ATIVE, noun
1. One that exhibits the likeness of another.
A statue of Rumor, whispering an idiot in the ear, who was the representative of credulity.
2. In legislative or other business, an agent, deputy or substitute who supplies the place of another or others, being invested with his or their authority. An attorney is the representative of his client or employer. A member of the house of commons is the representative of his constituents and of the nation. In matters concerning his constituents only, he is supposed to be bound by their instructions, but in the enacting of laws for the nation, he is supposed not to be bound by their instructions, as he acts for the whole nation.
3. In law, one that stands in the place of another as heir, or in the right of succeeding to an estate of inheritance, or to a crown.
4. That by which any thing is exhibited or shown.
This doctrine supposes the perfections of God to be the representatives to us of whatever we perceive in the creatures.

Bouvier’s Law Dictionary, 1856
REPRESENTATIVE.
1. One who represents or is in the place of another.
2. In legislation, it signifies one who has been elected a moraber of that branch of the legislature called the house of representatives.
3. A representative of a deceased person, sometimes called a "personal representative," or legal personal representative," is one who is executor or administrator of the person described. 6 Madd. 159; 5 yes. 402.

REPRESENTATIVE DEMOCRACY.
A form of government where the powers of the sovereignty are delegated to a body of men, elected from time to time, who exercise them for the benefit of the whole nation. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 31.

TO REPRESENT.
To exhibit; to expose before the eyes: to represent a thing is to produce it publicly. Dig. 10, 4, 2, 3.

REPRESENTATION, insurances.
1. A representation is a collateral statement, either by writing not inserted in the policy, or by parol, of such facts or circumstances relative to the proposed adventure, as are necessary to be communicated to the underwriters, to enable them to form a just estimate of the risk.
2. A representation, like a warranty, may be either affirmative, as where the insured avers the existence of some fact or circumstance which may affect the risk; or promissory, as where he engages the performance of, something executory.
3. There is a material difference between a representation and a warranty.
4. A warranty, being a condition upon which the contract is to take effect, is always a part of the written policy, and must appear on the face of it. Marsh. Ins. c. 9, §2. Whereas a representation is only a matter of collateral information or intelligence on the subject of the voyage insured, and makes no part of the policy. A warranty being in the nature of a condition precedent, must be strictly and literally complied with; but it is sufficient if the representation be true in substance, whether a warranty be material to the risk or not, the insured stakes his claim of indemnity upon the precise truth of it, if it be affirmative, or upon the exact performance of it, if executory; but it is sufficient if a representation be made without fraud, and be not false in any material point, or if it be substantially, though not literally, fulfilled. A false warranty avoids the policy, as being a breach of the condition upon which the contract is to take effect; and the insurer is not liable for any loss though it do not happen in consequence of the breach of the warranty; a false representation is no breach of the contract, but if material, avoids the policy on the ground of fraud, or at least because the insurer has been misled by it. Marsh. Insur. B. 1, c. 10, s. 1; Dougl. R. 247: 4 Bro. P. C. 482.
See 2 Caines' R. 155; 1 Johns. Cas. 408; 2 Caines' Cas. 173, n.; 3 Johns. Cas. 47; 1 Caines' Rep. 288; 2 Caines' R. 22; Id. 329; Sugd. Vend. 6; Bouv. Inst. Index, h. t. and Concealment; Misrepresentation.

REPRESENTATION, Scotch law.
The name of a plea or statement presented to a lord ordinary of the court of sessions, when his judgment is brought under review.

REPRESENTATION OF PERSONS;
1. A fiction of the law, the effect of which is to put the representative in the place, degree, or right of the person represen ted.
2. The heir represents his ancestor. Bac. Abr. Heir and Ancestor, A. The devisee, his testator; the executor, his testator; the administrator, his intestate; the successor in corporations, his predecessor. And generally speaking they are entitled to the rights of the persons whom they represent, and bound to fulfil the duties and obligations, which were binding upon them in those characters.
3. Representation was unknown to the Romans, and was invented by the commentators and doctors of the civil law. Toull. Dr. Civ. Fr. liv. 3, t. 1, c. 3, n. 180. Vide Ayl. Pand. 397; Dall. Diet. mot Succession, art. 4, §2.
Black's Law Dictionary, 1st Edition, 1891
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WEX Legal Dictionary
Represent
1) To act as the agent for another.
2) To serve -- for example, as a member of a legislative body after an election.
3) To act as a client's attorney.
4) To state something as a fact, such as "This horse is only four years old."

Representative
1) An agent or other individual who stands in for another.
2) Someone who serves a constituency, such as a member of the House of Representatives.
3) The executor or administrator of the estate of a person who has died, sometimes called a personal representative.

Personal Representative
An alternative term for the executor or administrator of an estate, commonly used in states that have adopted a law called the Uniform Probate Code.
QUOTES

Daniel Webster:
We are in danger of being overwhelmed with irredeemable paper, mere paper, representing not gold nor silver; no sir, representing nothing but broken promises, bad faith, bankrupt corporations, cheated creditors and a ruined people.
Auberon Herbert:
We hold that what one man cannot morally do, a million men cannot morally do, and government, representing many millions of men, cannot do.
Alexis de Tocqueville:
The electors see their representative not only as a legislator for the state but also as the natural protector of local interests in the legislature; indeed, they almost seem to think that he has a power of attorney to represent each constituent, and they trust him to be as eager in their private interests as in those of the country.
William Graham Sumner:
Gentlemen, the time is coming when there will be two great classes, Socialists, and Anarchists. The Anarchists want the government to be nothing, and the Socialists want government to be everything. There can be no greater contrast. Well, the time will come when there will be only these two great parties, the Anarchists representing the laissez faire doctrine and the Socialists representing the extreme view on the other side, and when that time comes I am an Anarchist.
Alexander Hamilton:
No legislative act contrary to the Constitution can be valid. To deny this would be to affirm that the deputy (agent) is greater than his principal; that the servant is above the master; that the representatives of the people are superior to the people; that men, acting by virtue of powers may do not only what their powers do not authorize, but what they forbid. It is not to be supposed that the Constitution could intend to enable the representatives of the people to substitute their will to that of their constituents. A Constitution is, in fact, and must be regarded by judges as fundamental law. If there should happen to be a irreconcilable variance between the two, the Constitution is to be preferred to the statute.
If the representatives of the people betray their constituents, there is then no recourse left but in the exertion of that original right of self-defense which is paramount to all positive forms of government...
John Adams:
Each individual of the society has a right to be protected by it in the enjoyment of his life, liberty, and property, according to standing laws. He is obliged, consequently, to contribute his share to the expense of this protection; and to give his personal service, or an equivalent, when necessary. But no part of the property of any individual can, with justice, be taken from him, or applied to public uses, without his own consent, or that of the representative body of the people. In fine, the people of this commonwealth are not controllable by any other laws than those to which their constitutional representative body have given their consent.
Lysander Spooner:
The Rothschilds, and that class of money-lenders of whom they are the representatives and agents - men who never think of lending a shilling to their next-door neighbors, for purposes of honest industry, unless upon the most ample security, and at the highest rate of interest - stand ready, at all times, to lend money in unlimited amounts to those robbers and murderers, who call themselves governments, to be expended in shooting down those who do not submit quietly to being robbed and enslaved.
The 'nations,' as they are called, with whom our pretended ambassadors, secretaries, presidents, and senators profess to make treaties, are as much myths as our own. On general principles of law and reason, there are no such 'nations.' ... Our pretended treaties, then, being made with no legitimate or bona fide nations, or representatives of nations, and being made, on our part, by persons who have no legitimate authority to act for us, have intrinsically no more validity than a pretended treaty made by the Man in the Moon with the king of the Pleiades.
Mahatma Mohandas K. Gandhi:
The state represents violence in a concentrated and organized form. The individual has a soul, but as the state is a soulless machine, it can never be weaned from violence to which it owes its very existence.
Dr. Ron Paul:
The moral and constitutional obligations of our representatives in Washington are to protect our liberty, not coddle the world, precipitating no-win wars, while bringing bankruptcy and economic turmoil to our people.
Justice William O. Douglas:
Since when have we Americans been expected to bow submissively to authority and speak with awe and reverence to those who represent us?
Charley Reese:
If you look at Washington, you see permanently camped on the banks of the Potomac spread around in concentric circles an army representing thousands of selfish interests. The sole purpose of their presence is to plunder, by hook or crook, the public treasury for the benefit of their particular people or corporations.

Senator William Jenner:
Outwardly we have a Constitutional government. We have operating within our government and political system, another body representing another form of government, a bureaucratic elite which believes our Constitution is outmoded.

Louis Dolivet:
The United States has no jurisdiction. No representative of administrative, judicial, military, or police authority of the United States may enter that zone without permission of the Secretary-General. In short: as long as the seat of the United Nations remains within the United States, the area occupied by the United Nations is considered as extraterritorial [separate from the United States] with full diplomatic privileges and immunities.
Murray N. Rothbard:
We must, therefore, emphasize that 'we' are not the government; the government is not 'us.' The government does not in any accurate sense 'represent' the majority of the people. But, even if it did, even if 70 percent of the people decided to murder the remaining 30 percent, this would still be murder and would not be voluntary suicide on the part of the slaughtered minority. No organicist metaphor, no irrelevant bromide that 'we are all part of one another,' must be permitted to obscure this basic fact.
John Hospers:
By far the most numerous and most flagrant violations of personal liberty and individual rights are performed by governments. The major crimes throughout history, the ones executed on the largest scale, have been committed not by individuals or bands of individuals but by governments, as a deliberate policy of those governments, that is, by the official representatives of governments, acting in their official capacity.
Albert Einstein:
To be sure, the doctrine of a personal God interfering with natural events could never be refuted, in the real sense, by science, for this doctrine can always take refuge in those domains in which scientific knowledge has not yet been able to set foot. But I am persuaded that such behavior on the part of the representatives of religion would not only be unworthy but also fatal. For a doctrine which is able to maintain itself not in clear light, but only in the dark, will of necessity lose its effect on mankind, with incalculable harm to human progress.
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